Smartphone monitoring in MS

The latest results from the FLOODLIGHT clinical trial programme show that additional, real-world data using smartphone or smartwatch technology given to patients treated with Roche’s MS therapy Ocrevus (ocrelizumab), which was launched in March, can be a valuable addition to in-clinic measures.

The Android-based app uses smartphone sensors (the accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer) to measure both active neurological tests – in which the patient is asked to perform tasks such as daily hand motor function, gait and static balance tests, weekly cognitive tests, and patient-reported outcomes – as well as passive monitoring of metrics on gait and mobility, to provide objective measures of disease progression.

MS isn’t the first disease in which Roche had used this app-based monitoring technology. The company has also put an app for Parkinson’s disease through its paces within a phase I trial.

Meanwhile, Novartis has also been looking at the use of smartphone-collected data in MS in its elevateMS study, which got underway in August and is focused on understanding the daily challenges for MS patients and trying to develop new real-time measures that can be used to help determine treatment effectiveness.

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